The Perilous Gard by Elizabeth Marie Pope

Elizabeth Marie Pope published two novels: The Sherwood Ring and The Perilous Gard. I adored both books in high school and read them repeatedly. I wrote a review of The Sherwood Ring way back in 2013 (not a very good review, somehow Holmes became homes, but a heartfelt one.) Since then, however, I have not had much to do with Elizabeth Marie Pope and her novels. Something recently reminded me of The Perilous Gard and I decided to get it from the library and give it another re-read. I expected a charming stroll through a former favorite. Instead, I made it halfway through and discovered I was…bored. 

More than bored, I was dismayed to discover I wasn’t even enjoying the story. The writing felt long and unnecessarily cluttered with semicolons and run-on sentences. Even though I had read the book many times before, I couldn’t remember what happened next. How had this story left so little an impression on me? I still loved the stark, black and white illustrations but I couldn’t find the magic that once drew me back over and over again. Until I hit the climax. 

The Perilous Gard is set in the final years of the reign of Queen Mary Tudor. Lady Katherine Sutton, lady-in-waiting to the Princess Elizabeth, is banished to the Perilous Gard, a castle in the middle of nowhere. While there, she discovers a dark secret about the disappearance of a little girl and the existence of Fairy Folk. In order to save the young lord of the manor, she must rescue him and the surrounding area from an ancient evil.

Once the book hit about halfway, things started picking up. I didn’t notice the writing as much and I found myself simply swept into the story, curious about what would come next. The world of the fairies feeds the imagination and Kate’s adventures in their land more than makes up for the slow first half. For the second half alone, I would call this a good, even a great, book. 

However, it was the last chapter that won me over. It was like…reading a memory, but not in the sense that I suddenly remembered what came next. That was still dim to me. However, as I read that final chapter, I remembered reading the words before, over and over. It wasn’t just the book I loved; it was this last chapter and the final hurdles Kate and Christopher overcome to live happily ever after. As a high schooler, this was my ideal romance. Now, to be honest, the lines seem a little corny, but I remember how much I loved them. I almost memorized them because I read them so often, just that same final chapter, over and over. 

For that sense of memory, I feel very indebted to this book. Is it good? I think so, but I am hardly an unbiased audience. I love Kate and I love Christopher and I see how my love of them led me to love Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer and the romances they wrote when I was a little older. This was a good re-read. In fact, I might just read that last chapter again tonight, for old times sake. 

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