Tag Archives: authors

Quarantine House Memes

Have you seen the quarantine house memes? They tend to pop up on my favorite niche meme pages…like law school memes and Jane Austen memes. The premise is simple: pick a house!

I’d have to go with House #6 because Dorothy Parker

National Novel Writing Month — Choose Your Quarantine House ...

After much analysis….I have to go with House #4. House #5 close second because Howl. 

Hilary Davidson on Twitter: "Ditto… "

House #4 maybe? It would be highly entertaining. 

Going to have to go with House #3. The combination will either find the cure to COVID-19 or spend the entire time on theoretical debates. Entertaining either way.

House #5 because Mary Poppins.

House #6. Someone has to keep Laura sane.

These 'choose your quarantine house' games keep getting harder 😅

House #2. I like the idea of House #5, but seems kind of intense for being trapped in one place.

As my friend Kayla said, “That would be kinda awkward hanging out in houses with a bunch of dead guys.”

I lean House #6 but admittedly know little of dogs. 

House #4 all the way. J. Scalia, dissenting forever.

House #II for Justices Thomas and Frankfurter. I would go House III because Scalia but the Chief Justice would drive me crazy.

 

 

 


Semester Reads

Christmas came early (or perhaps late? I did accept this job last year) for me. I got finally got the syllabus for the class I am TAing for this semester and it includes the books we will be reading. The authors are:

  • Machiavelli 
  • Luther
  • Swift
  • Hobbes
  • Locke
  • Kant
  • Smith
  • Rousseau 
  • Marx
  • Nietzsche 

Going to be good!! I do hope my students are prepared for how much of a Locke fangirl I am.


My Brush With Fame

If you have followed this blog for any length of time, you know my favorite form of social media is Goodreads, AKA Facebook for books. 

A few weeks ago the most exciting thing ever happened on Goodreads: I got a friend request from Jennifer Kloester. 

AKA the woman who literally wrote the biography about my favorite author, Georgette Heyer. 

AKA arguably the foremost Heyer fan, or at least Heyer expert.*

Then a few days ago, I got a friend request from Rachel Hyland. 

AKA the editor of Heyer Society: Essays on the Literary Genius of Georgette Heyer and author of Reading Heyer: The Black Moth. 

AKA arguably the second most famous Heyer expert.*

I am in the company of geniuses

This is really one of the most exciting things that has ever happened to me. Like, even more exciting than when I got the friend request from Suzanne Allain. And that is still pretty high on the list. 

Here is my dilemma, though. I feel like I need to put more care into the books I read or review. Never mind that I will probably never interact with them. They still sent me (ME!) a friend request! Surely this comes with a special responsibility to not read lousy books..

 

*To be fair I have no backing for this claim except that to my knowledge these are the main people to be published about Heyer. The third is Jane Aiken Hodge but unfortunately she passed away. 


Marie Lu

Marie Lu is a popular Young Adult writer whose works always seem to be hovering about my to-read list never getting read. I finally decided to change that and over the past week or so read the first books in her two trilogies: The Young Elites and Legend. Unfortunately, neither overly impressed me. 

The Young Elites has an X-Men, fantasy feel. Certain survivors of a deadly fever start developing superhuman abilities. Society fears and alienates them. A few band together and become rebels, openly opposing and attacking the corrupt, inefficient government. I did not particularly care about any of the characters and this removed a lot of the emotional punch from the story. The writing style annoyed me. In the end, this book was more creative than Legend, but never enough to win me over.

With Legend, I liked the characters separately but was driven to distraction by their awkward insta-love. This is an unoriginal, dystopian novel that relies heavily on the usual trope but doesn’t particularly add anything. The writing style annoyed me so much I nearly gave up after the first two chapters. There is certainly some possibility here but it lacks the world-building necessary to be something really interesting. 

I might try her third series when it comes out but I probably won’t go out of my way to read it. 


2016 Reading Challenge: My 5 Star Reviews, Part 5

The final 6! I read a lot of amazing books in 2016. 

Mind of the Maker by Dorothy L. Sayers

In this intriguing book, Sayers tackles the “analogy” of God as Creator and takes a deeper look at what it means for humans, who create, to be made in the image of God. This was a good but very challenging read. I didn’t always understand the definitions or logic and often had to re-read passages. However, like with Chesterton, I came away with a greater understanding and desire to know more. Sayers’s approach to the Trinity is intriguing and it offers an interesting glimpse into the creative process. Overall, this book is definitely worth the effort. 

The Snow Goose by Paul Gallico 

At 48 pages, this is another charming children’s book that really stuck out this year. The Snow Goose is the story of a hunchbacked painter and a young girl who bond over a wounded snow goose. This book is surprisingly adult (not in content as much as depth) yet beautiful enough to read to children. Gorgeous art and an emotionally real plot. Though somewhat predictable, it is also sweet and noble.

For the Love of My Brothers: Unforgettable Stories from God’s Ambassador to the Suffering Church by Brother Andrew

For the Love of My Brothers picks up where God’s Smuggler ends and represents the expanded vision of Open Doors Ministry during/after the fall of communism. Though “dated” in some regards (I was age 3 and 5 respectively when this book was written and then updated), the book doesn’t feel obsolete. It was a great reminder of all God accomplished and continues to accomplish in the lives of believers across the world. Though I read a couple Brother Andrew books this year, I particularly appreciated this one because of my 2015 visit to Eastern Europe. 

Letters to Children by C.S. Lewis

Lewis received thousands of letters from children and this volume contains some of his answers. I found it immensely satisfying. Lewis’s letters are encouraging, instructive, and occasionally just about mundane things like the weather. There is a delightful amount about Narnia in this book. I love how often Lewis encourages children to write their own Narnia stories. He also answers lots of questions about the Narnia books (yay! More Narnia! Fangirls rejoice!) Even outside of Narnia, though, I was really surprised and impressed by how intelligently Lewis wrote to children. He peppers his letters with references to other books and texts. Truly worth reading and owning. 

The Revenge of Conscience: Politics and the Fall of Man by J. Budziszewski

An interesting  and challenging analysis of politics and Christianity. Budziszewski has two particularly intriguing chapters critiquing liberal and conservative viewpoints. However, the entire book is worth chewing over. I love his strong, pro-life arguments. Readable and worth the time, even if there are moments it feels “dated” and occasionally dense. One of those books I really enjoyed but I don’t expect most people to. 

Beauvallet by Georgette Heyer

It is very possible that I have lost all perspective and objectivity when it comes to Heyer. Even books I previously gave 3 stars I have been tempted to up to 5. I really, really love her writing and characters. While Beauvallet probably isn’t in my top 5 Heyer Reads, it is still pretty high up there. This is a grand, romantic, swashbuckling adventure set in the Elizabethan era. “Mad Nicholas” Beauvallet is a privateer and favorite of Queen Elizabeth who falls for a Spanish lady and determines to woo her, even if it means traveling through Spain where there is a price on his head. I was charmed to find the stereotypical Heyer characters out of their usual Regency setting and I liked the cameos from Sir Francis Drake, Queen Elizabeth, and Mary Stewart. Not perfect but certainly charming enough to win my heart.

 

 


2016 Reading Challenge: My 5 Star Reviews, Part 3

The 5-star, best of the best, reads from 2016! 

The Iliad by Homer

It is always difficult to rate a classic, but this is a super-duper classic. THE classic. A lot annoyed me in this story and I was often bored or grossed out, but the humanity captured is truly amazing. Many of the struggles, desires, emotions, and even insults thrown back and forth are recognizable and relevant today. This is a messed up story, but it is a also a story of coming to terms with grief and life and honor. It is incredible. My favorite “character” was Diomedes. I can’t believe I had never heard of him before! He was awesome! There is a reason this story has remained such a favorite for so long.

Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas 

I had some pretty high expectations for Bonhoeffer and, remarkably, it lived up to them. Bonhoeffer is great, not only because it is the story of the pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer, but because it incorporates WW2 history, theology, and the story of Germany in the early twentieth century all at the same time. I especially enjoyed the quotes from Bonhoeffer. I am going to have to read more by him. This book may be thick but it is worth it. Highly recommended for lovers of history and anyone who wants to learn more about a fascinating, relatively unknown and unsung hero of WW2.

David Copperfield by Charles Dickens 

Despite being ridiculously long and occasionally mindbogglingly boring, this book was wonderful and hard to put down. There were moments I loved it and moments I hated it. However, in the end, loving or hating, I really enjoyed David Copperfield and it might surpass Our Mutual Friend as my favorite Dickens novel. You can never tell what will happen next. There were a lot of characters but it was surprisingly easy to keep them straight. I like how everything was tied up and how everything comes around. The description on the audio book says, “tragedy and comedy in equal measure.” That is this book in a nutshell. It will make you laugh and it will make you cry. And in the end, it is totally worth the 34 hours, or 900 some pages, or whatever else it takes to get through it. Go Dickens!

Poems by C.S. Lewis 

Did you know Lewis was a poet? He was a really good one, too. In general, I don’t read poetry but this volume gave me a better sense of why people like it. Poetry can be bite size brilliance. These were utterly profound but applicable and memorable. My favorites were “Pan’s Purge”, “Reason”, and “The Country of the Blind.” Some of Lewis’s poems are silly. Some are profound. Quite a few confound me with allusions to things I know nothing about. He writes about angels and nature, love and Dwarfs. Well worth finding. 

The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka 

I like this book because I could enjoy it just as it was, as a story, and yet also enjoy it as a classic literary work revealing human nature. I like Gregor and the love he has for his family, a love eventually worn down by self-absorption and then flipped again in his last moments. I actually liked his family as well with all their passivity, self-absorption, and laziness. Basically, they are horrible humans, but they ring true. The way they behave towards Gregor felt completely natural and realistic. Kafka makes a brilliant point about human dependency and how we let things control our whole lives. Fascinating stuff! 

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens 

Another Dickens novel! This timeless Christmas tale was even better than I expected. The book is simple and yet timeless. I don’t know what else to add because you probably already know about Scrooge and his nocturnal visitors, this story is part of our common culture. I thought I knew it. However, it has more depth than I realized. If you haven’t read it for yourself, I recommend doing so. 

Common Sense by Thomas Paine 

The historical significance of Common Sense alone argues for a 5 star rating. Highly readable, this pamphlet references natural law, legal theory, historical precedent, and Old Testament narrative. It made for an enjoyable read and provides insight into what fired up our Founding Fathers. I was pleasantly surprised by this one! 


2016 Reading Challenge: My 5 Star Reviews, Part 2

The best books I read in 2016…take two! 

Orphan Justice: How to Care for Orphans Beyond Adopting by Johnny Carr and Laura Faidley

Orphan Justice is a blunt look at the intellectual and emotional problem of orphans and the way society handles, or rather doesn’t handle, them. While promoting adoption, this book also focuses on solutions that help orphans beyond adopting. It addresses many issues facing society from child trafficking and HIV/AIDS to racism and poverty. A very convicting, challenging read. 

Georgette Heyer by Jennifer Kloester

Georgette Heyer is one of my favorite authors and I really enjoyed reading about her life. This book has its problems, perhaps more than others on this list, but it was such a treat to read about an author I deeply adore, even after learning about her flaws. And Heyer definitely had her flaws. From her inability to manage her finances to her weird marriage to her extreme shyness, Heyer was a strange, snobbish woman who yet remains extremely recognizable. She really is “to be found in [her] work.” A definite must-read for all Heyer-lovers. 

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley 

Despite its bizarre premise, Frankenstein was a really good read. Though the details in the writing occasionally got on my nerves (this was the age of Romanticism), the overall plot was captivating and tumultuous. It is Gothic horror. The Gothic portion gives it historical importance; the horror gives it a timeless interest. The book is a great combination of literary merit with themes about morality, responsibility, etc. and is full of genuinely good storytelling. It is an English major’s book but also Bookworm’s book too. Win, win.

The Mysterious Affair At Styles by Agatha Christie 

Christie’s first mystery, The Mysterious Affair At Styles also introduces her starring detective, Hercule Poirot. Emily Inglethorp rules Styles, but when she is suddenly found dead, her new neighbor Poirot is called in to find out why! This book was marvelous. There were a host of interesting characters and a most naive but endearing narrator. I enjoyed the story thoroughly and was kept guessing the whole time.

Destiny of a Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard 

This is a biography about the assassination of President James A. Garfield. I knew very little about Garfield going into the book and was pleasantly surprised by how readable and informative it turned out to be. I have a greater understanding of him as a president and era he lived in. I especially appreciated reading this one during an election year.  It reminded me that as dreary and depressing as this political season has been, America has weathered worse. As a country, we’ve dealt with corruption, assassinations, and Civil War. We survive and move on. Well worth reading! 

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

Shorter than I expected, but exceptionally good regardless. It wasn’t over the top but still dark and interesting. I was most fascinated by Dr. Jekyll’s initial reaction to Hyde. Unlike Dr. Frankenstein, who gets all pale and wussy because he created something ugly, Dr. Jekyll initially celebrates his alter-ego. He puts aside Hyde because of society’s condemnation, but it isn’t until he sees his friend’s abhorrence that he really understands what he did. Really fascinating. 

Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory by Ben Macintyre 

In 1943, the Allied forces wanted the Axis to think they were attacking Sardinia rather than their actual target, Sicily. To convince them, British intelligence concocted a crazy scheme involving a dead body, forged papers, fake German spies, and the Spanish government. In this bizarre but true account, Macintyre masterfully recounts the story of the men who influenced and enacted the deception. I highly, highly recommend this one. 


Reading Metrics 2016

I was hoping to eek out one or two more books before the end of the year but a quick glance at my schedule tells me this is unlikely. It has been a good year; I read more books than last year. My final total: 168 new books in 2016. (Only 3 re-reads, though. 😦 ) It was a total of 41,409 pages (less than average but the book quality was overall better.) 

My average rating was 3.5 stars and a great chunk of the books came from my to-read list (hurray!) For several weeks, I actually had that list under 950. (Then the Summit Oxford 2017 Reading List was published. Sigh.) However, it is still under 1,000 which I consider quite the accomplishment. 

Last year I met the gang at the Algonquin Round Table…this year I discovered the literary circle of the Detection Club and in particular became enamored with Agatha Christie, Dorothy L Sayers, and G.K. Chesterton. (I’ve always loved these authors but I didn’t know much about their personal lives.) 

My favorite book this year: All The King’s Men by Robert Penn Warren. 

The most disappointing book: Girl Online by Zoe Sugg. 

My favorite author from this year: Anne Brontë.

The most unexpectedly-good book: Written in Red by Anne Bishop. (Disclaimer: dark book, not for everyone. I found the sequel inappropriate and did not finish) 

The best series I read this year: The Lynburn Legacy by Sarah Rees Brennan (at any rate, it was the only series I started and decided to finished) 

The best guilty-pleasure book: Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling. 

The longest book: Winter by Marissa Meyer. (832 pages)

Shortest book: The Snow Goose by Paul Gallico. (48 pages)

Best Fairy Tale: Valiant by Sarah McGuire 

 

 


Jean Webster

Despite their tendency towards socialism and eugenics (this was the very beginning of the 1900s), I love the books Daddy-Long-Legs and Dear Enemy by Jean Webster. I love the strong heroines and fun plots. I knew Jean Webster had written other books but I never thought I would actually find one…however, I did! I bought Just Patty for $2 and it was probably the best $2 I spent all year. I’ll be reviewing that one along with all my other 5 star reviews in my end of the year book post. Keep your eye out for it!

I never before realized how remarkably ‘progressive’ Jean Webster was for her time. When she died in 1916 at age 30, women still didn’t have the vote. You wouldn’t guess it from her novels, however. Her heroines are hale and hearty and usually college bound. They jump from geometry to party dresses without batting an eyelash. In fact, the more I think about the era they were written in, the more I love these novels! I really want to find When Patty Went to College, which was her first book written in 1903. While her works aren’t overly political, they contain sharp social commentary that makes you think, even today. 


The Perilous Gard by Elizabeth Marie Pope

Elizabeth Marie Pope published two novels: The Sherwood Ring and The Perilous Gard. I adored both books in high school and read them repeatedly. I wrote a review of The Sherwood Ring way back in 2013 (not a very good review, somehow Holmes became homes, but a heartfelt one.) Since then, however, I have not had much to do with Elizabeth Marie Pope and her novels. Something recently reminded me of The Perilous Gard and I decided to get it from the library and give it another re-read. I expected a charming stroll through a former favorite. Instead, I made it halfway through and discovered I was…bored. 

More than bored, I was dismayed to discover I wasn’t even enjoying the story. The writing felt long and unnecessarily cluttered with semicolons and run-on sentences. Even though I had read the book many times before, I couldn’t remember what happened next. How had this story left so little an impression on me? I still loved the stark, black and white illustrations but I couldn’t find the magic that once drew me back over and over again. Until I hit the climax. 

The Perilous Gard is set in the final years of the reign of Queen Mary Tudor. Lady Katherine Sutton, lady-in-waiting to the Princess Elizabeth, is banished to the Perilous Gard, a castle in the middle of nowhere. While there, she discovers a dark secret about the disappearance of a little girl and the existence of Fairy Folk. In order to save the young lord of the manor, she must rescue him and the surrounding area from an ancient evil.

Once the book hit about halfway, things started picking up. I didn’t notice the writing as much and I found myself simply swept into the story, curious about what would come next. The world of the fairies feeds the imagination and Kate’s adventures in their land more than makes up for the slow first half. For the second half alone, I would call this a good, even a great, book. 

However, it was the last chapter that won me over. It was like…reading a memory, but not in the sense that I suddenly remembered what came next. That was still dim to me. However, as I read that final chapter, I remembered reading the words before, over and over. It wasn’t just the book I loved; it was this last chapter and the final hurdles Kate and Christopher overcome to live happily ever after. As a high schooler, this was my ideal romance. Now, to be honest, the lines seem a little corny, but I remember how much I loved them. I almost memorized them because I read them so often, just that same final chapter, over and over. 

For that sense of memory, I feel very indebted to this book. Is it good? I think so, but I am hardly an unbiased audience. I love Kate and I love Christopher and I see how my love of them led me to love Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer and the romances they wrote when I was a little older. This was a good re-read. In fact, I might just read that last chapter again tonight, for old times sake.