Tag Archives: bookworm

A Bad Beginning: My 2018 Reading Challenge

Of the 11 books I have read so far in 2018, 4 of them have been 1 star reads. 4! And not one of the remaining 7 books were worth 5 stars. I’m quite dismayed about this beginning. I hope it is not a sign for the rest of 2018!

P.S. My reading goal this year is 118 books, but I’m not sure I’ll make it. Especially if I continue choosing such lousy books! 

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The 3 Books I Chose

Because I know you are all breathlessly waiting to find out how yesterday’s saga ended…here is the result. I decided to highlight: 

Entrepreneurship For Human Flourishing by Peter Greer
Overrated by Eugene Cho
Orthodoxy by G. K. Chesterton 

 

If you had to pick 3 books that most impacted your life, which ones would you choose? 


How Am I Supposed To Pick Only 3 Books?!

What three books, besides the Bible, have had the greatest impact on your life? Why and how so? asks the essay prompt. Answer in 600 words.

You would think this would be the easiest prompt ever. I did when I first saw it. However, after several days of agonizing, I am no closer to narrowing down three books than I am to cleaning my room. (And both need to happen pronto.) 

But really, how do you approach something like greatest impact? Does that mean books you have read the most? Or books that blew your mind? And what timeline should we consider for the greatest impact? I read so many books each year that the ones that most impact my life change from year to year, and I feel like I could make a case for all of them. Even the one stars. 

For example, is it weird to put down John Locke’s Second Treatise of Government? I did not read it till my junior year of college, but I stayed up till 2 am to finish it because I liked it so much. The book influenced my political philosophy long before I read it. But then really, if I am tracing political influence maybe I should mention Basic American Government by Clarence B. Carson because that is where I first read snip-its of Locke and other political philosophers. Then again, who names books about foundational political philosophy when mentioning books that had the greatest impact? Isn’t that weird?

So I think, what book is foundational to my reading? Good Profit! I read all business books through the lens of Good Profit and my time at AFP. I read that one twice I liked it so much. But…isn’t it really AFP that had the impact on my life, not the book? So is it really one of the most impactful books I have read? 

Perhaps I ought to consider the books I re-read the most. Like…Georgette Heyer! I can see it now. “The Grand Sophy is a Regency romance novel full of wit and charm and it has had the greatest impact on my life.” Um, how ’bout no. 

The Witch of Blackbird Pond – my go-to favorite book of all time? I certainly could make an argument that it played a foundational role in my early reading. Then again, so did the Mandie series and Hardy Boys. That doesn’t mean they deserve a shout-out. 

C.S. Lewis! There is an author whose writings I love and don’t need to be ashamed of. But which writing? The only books of his I have re-read are the Narnia series and Till We Have Faces! But have those had The Most Impact on my life?! Surely Mere Christianity ranks higher. 

So there. I have one. Mere Christianity. When did I read that one again? 

Agghhhhh! In conclusion, I’ve been influenced by too much fiction and I do not know how to answer this essay prompt and blogging about this predicament has not clarified anything at all. 


What am I getting myself into?

There are two words that have never been used to describe me: athletic or outdoorsy. This is so patently obvious to those who know me that I can’t think of a way to stress how ridiculous my traipsing off to Idaho must seem. It is crazy. I’m the girl who has never worn sports shorts in her life, now I own enough to get me through a week easily. I’ve stocked up on sports bras and flannel and even considered buying chacos. I’m going to spend a summer without books or K Dramas or Facebook messenger. It is insanity! 

And yet…I’m excited. This is so not me that it is going to be a crazy, new adventure. I’m going to face my fears, be separated from my comforts, and hopefully grow in my walk with God. I’m going to learn new skills. For three months, I get to step away from everything and try something different. 

At the risk of sounding cliche, I’m also excited to find a new side of myself. I’ve been defined by my job for so long that I looking forward to discovering who else I can be. Who is Amy when you stick her 45 minutes from civilization and throw a cabin full of kids at her? My hope is that she will be someone who learns to live more fully in the present. 

Am I slightly terrified beginning this new adventure? Definitely. But I am also super excited. It isn’t quite backpacking across the Himalayas, but camp in Idaho for the summer is going to be a really fun, challenging experience. 


Two New Books

Shhhh, don’t tell my sisters, but I bought two new books today! The first is The Creators: A History of Heroes of the Imagination by Daniel J. Boorstin. It is 811 pages and I’ve never heard of it before. However, I found it at the bookstore and became intrigued. It was written in 1992 and reviews are few and far between on Goodreads. Who knows? Perhaps I have found a treasure, perhaps a flop. 

The second book I got is Enough Rope by Dorothy Parker. This book contains poems written in 1926 (re-published in 1940) and is only 110 pages long. Dorothy Parker is a biting, brilliant, and fun author to read. The subtitle on this book is, “A brilliant collection of witty verses guaranteed to dispel gloom. By the author of SUNSET GUN and DEATH AND TAXES.”

I don’t know about you, but simply seeing the title of Death and Taxes makes me want to find it. At any rate, Dorothy Parker doesn’t disappoint. 


Tuesday Teaser #TuesdayBookBlog

Tuesday teaser is a weekly bookish meme hosted by http://www.booksandabeat.com

Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read.
  • Open to a random page.
  • Share two or three *teaser* sentences from somewhere on that page.
  • Be careful not to include spoilers ~ make sure what you share doesn’t give to much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others.

Share the title and the author too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR list if they like your teasers!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“You want to order? I got other customers to think about.”
He looked around the deserted cafe as the 7UP clock clicked loud and lonely on the far wall. “Other customers? Where?”
“On their way over here.”
“Oh.” (pg. 6-7)

I just finished a business book and a psychological thriller, so now I’m aiming for something a little more light-hearted. I think this one will fit the bill quite nicely. 


Young Adult Literature – PG or PG13?

I was around 12 when I made the “jump” (as I considered it) from the Juvenile Fiction section of the library to the Young Adult side. Besides a geographical relocation, the biggest impact of the move was that I now had to be extra careful with the books I selected. Compared to Juvenile Fiction (where anything besides a chaste kiss would have been shocking), the Young Adult books I perused seemed chalk full of sex, language, and dark, mature content. Where I once read broadly from all genres and authors, I now tiptoed, jumping from safe series (like the Hardy Boys Classified) to familiar authors (like Jessica Day George). In fact, it wasn’t until college that I fully embraced YA as a genre and felt comfortable trying books at random.  It seems silly now, but at the time this search for “safety” involved quite a bit of soul searching and boundary stretching on my part. 

Part of what got me reading YA broadly was that I moved libraries. The tiny, local library in Dayton, TN didn’t have the resources for a kids’ section and a teens’ section. The result was a sort of hodgepodge of the two, broadly called “Young Adult.” A part of me always felt they got it wrong. Either you have “clean” books, or you don’t. You can’t mix them. 

However, looking at it now, I’ve started to wonder about my definition of “young adult.” I’ve always considered it like a PG13 movie rating. When you enter, you go in with the knowledge that there is “mature content ahead.” Many books I’ve seen placed in YA recently seem to belong to the more innocuous PG rating, however. It is somewhat more mature than a G rating (or traditional Juvenile Fiction), but comparatively clean. Or perhaps they are just coming of age stories a grade schooler wouldn’t find interesting, particularly if it contains older characters or more subtle themes. 

I suppose the YA genre is a mix of PG and PG13, though it still seems like a nuanced jump to me. How would you define YA? Do you have a particular way of categorizing it in your mind?