Tag Archives: long books

Whatcha Reading…? 1/28/2019 Book Update

Back in 2016-2017, I used to do an occasional “Whatcha Reading” update. Basically, when I find myself buried in avalanche of current reads, I like sorting them out on here. 

Now, I know what you are thinking! “BUT WHAT ABOUT THAILAND?!” I promise I’m still here. The thing is, due to certain circumstances, I spent the weekend at home. And really, the most exciting thing I accomplished was laundry. I’ve strained my brain to make laundry an entertaining story, but mostly it involved me lacking the correct change and making strategic visits to the convenience store to get more. Mostly I read. And as I’ve decided to tackle several rather long books courtesy but my new Kindle, a “Whatcha Reading” update is the best way I can describe my weekend.

Without further ado, I present you my current reads: Summa Theologica by Thomas Aquinas, Ethics by Aristotle, The City of God by Saint Augustine, Pamela by Samuel Richardson, and Letters to a Diminished Church by Dorothy L. Sayers. (And lest you think my reading involves only intellectual works, I must confess I recently finished To Catch A Bad Guy by Marie Astor, Chocolate Chip Cookie Murder by Joane Flunke, and The Cinderella Deal by Jennifer Cruise – all as horrible as they sound.) As you can see, I’m working through the As on my Kindle. 

Summa Theologica by Thomas Aquinas is 95,666 pages long. I’m 1,520 pages in –  about 1%. I do not plan on finishing it this year…or next…or maybe the year after. But the work played an instrumental role in developing Western thought so I figure it is worth the long term commitment. 

Ethics by Aristotle…I am not sure what I think about this one yet. Obviously, I’m familiar with Aristotle’s theory of virtue as the mean between two extremes. He jumps around quite a bit, however, between personal application of virtue and civic virtue. His explanation of justice I found particularly intriguing. Mostly I feel like I miss as much as I understand. But I find his method of explaining things helps me better understand Aquinas. (Similar formatting of arguments.) 

I purchased my copy of The City of God by Saint Augustine instead of getting the free version and I am amazed the difference a good translation makes. I am not particularly far into the book but I’m quite intrigued. It begins with a seeming history lesson about the barbarians who sacked Rome but did not touch the Christian churches. Amidst this strange beginning, Saint Augustine weaves several points about human suffering. 

Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded by Samuel Richardson was published in 1740 and I’ve been dragging myself through it since last July. Though a remarkable literary achievement for its time, I find the entire work slow and irritating. But I’m also stubbornly determined to finish it since it was a ‘first’ for many literary tropes we use today. (And Jane Austen read it.) 

Letters to a Diminished Church by Dorothy L. Sayers is incredibly good so far. I find it easier to grasp than her work about the trinity, The Mind of the Maker. In this book, she tackles Christian doctrine. She continues to emphasize the creativity of God and the importance of creation for human identity. I’m convinced this one will end up an immediate favorite. 


2018 Reading Stats

My 2018 Reading Stats

255 books across 75,094 pages. Of the 255, 39 were re-reads. A disconcerting number were set in the regency era. (That kind of defined my reading this year. At this rate, I could get into a time machine to 1815 and probably survive quite nicely.)

Average rating: 3.4 stars

Average Book Length: 294 pages

Achievements: I got my to-read list under 900. For like, a day there. Currently at 901.

My Favorite Book This Year: Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance

Read my Mind Blown post tomorrow for why!

Most disappointing book: Hello, I Love You by Katie M. Stout

Since this book received 2 stars, it does not come up again in my posts, so here is the brief version: YA novel with a K pop star love interest? Um, yes. Sign me up! But unfortunately, it was terrible. The end.

Best Re-Read: The Year of Secret Assignments by Jaclyn Moriarty

This was such a hard category. I re-read several books this year that pleasantly surprised me or delighted me as old favorites. However, in the end, this one wins because it wasn’t actually an old favorite. I originally gave it 4 stars but kind of forgot about it. This time through, though, I loved it and won’t soon forget it. I ran through the gamut of emotions reading it. Jaclyn Moriarty really is a fantastic author. Her strength lies in her unique way of telling a story – in this case, through letters between pen pals at two different high schools. Warning: some language.

Best Author: Georgette Heyer

Hands down. She ties with C.S. Lewis for my Favorite Author of All Time, but I did not re-read any Lewis this year. Just Heyer. All the Heyer. (Actually, only 19 Heyer. But still. I re-read 19 of her books this year.)  

Best middle school read: All Rise For the Honorable Perry T. Cook by Leslie Connor

You’ll find a full review somewhere in my 5 Star reads posts.

Longest Read: Process of Constitutional Decisionmaking: Cases and Materials by Paul Brest at 1,856 pages

A decent textbook but heavy on history over caselaw.

Shortest Read: Thief! by Megan Whalen Turner at 8 pages

But since it was Megan Whalen Turner, those were probably the best 8 pages I read this year. If you haven’t read her Queen’s Thief series yet…go and do.