Tag Archives: quotes

July 3rd

Mom: “So…I guess Captain America visits tonight? Gotta leave out milk and cookies.”

Me: “I can get behind this mythology. But what does he bring?”

Bethany: * from other room * “FREEDOM.”

Image may contain: one or more people, text that says 'Remember to leave some cookies and milk out tonight for Captain America.'

Final Grandpa Quotes

On Travel:

“I didn’t think any of my family would go to Thailand or Korea unless they were forced to in the military.”

On Finances:

“Outlive everyone you have a life insurance policy on.”

On Books Read So Far This Year:

“I’m in two but I already read one of them. Thing is, I’ve forgotten it so I have to find out what happens.”

On Cooking:

Grandpa: “Well, I’m becoming quite a little homemaker. I just made dessert for 4.”
Me: “But Grandpa, there are 5 of us for dinner tonight.”
Grandpa: *long pause* damn

On Spaghetti:

“Pass the salt.”

.

Truly an awesome visit. Glad I got to go.


Moments with Grandpa

I offered to run some errands for Grandpa and needed to put my number in his phone. He wanted a picture of me to pop up when I call and I protested that I hadn’t showered or done my makeup. He laughed it off.

A few hours later, he looked at the pictures and announced: “Yeah, I should have let you do your hair.”

I got back from running errands and handed Grandpa the leftover cash.

“Change!” Grandpa exclaimed. “If my daughters brought me change, I’d be a much wealthier man than I am now.”

So far I’ve seen my grandpa salt his gas station pizza, salt his sandwich, and salt his french fries. Finally I asked him about his salt consumption:

“Well,” he answered, “I figure eventually they will get on me some diet for my blood pressure, but they don’t have me on one right now, so I’m going to enjoy it while I can! And anyway, I never thought I’d live this long. I expected someone to have shot me by now.”


Tuesday Teaser #TuesdayBookBlog

Today was singularly uninspiring since I just worked on my paper and did TA stuff all day so here we go…

I don’t know if this is still a thing but…

Tuesday teaser is (was?) a weekly bookish meme hosted by http://www.booksandabeat.com

Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read.
  • Open to a random page.
  • Share two or three *teaser* sentences from somewhere on that page.
  • Be careful not to include spoilers ~ make sure what you share doesn’t give to much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others.

Share the title and the author too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR list if they like your teasers!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Flatshare: A Novel: O'Leary, Beth: 9781250295637: Amazon.com ...

“Life is often simple, but you don’t notice how simple it was until it gets incredibly complicated, like how you never feel grateful for being well until you’re ill, or how you never appreciate your tights drawer until you rip a pair and have no spares.”


Personalities On The Bus

You would not think it, but 8:30 pm is a pretty sketchy time to take the bus. It smells like pot and body odor. Tonight, though, it proved pretty entertaining. A certain individual had clearly taken allllllllllll the drugs and was uttering nuggets of, er, wisdom. Here were a few of his utterances. (No transition between them in person!)  

  • “Forget Madison! Let’s go to Canada and live in my mansion!”
    .
  • “No one says anything because no one thinks anything, but I talk anyway because it is about the experience you bring.”
    .
  • “Math is funny. All phone numbers are composed of the same numbers.”
    .
  • “Where we are going you need to be smarter than the dog behind the fence. You need to get around the fence. But the dog can’t. Madison is the fence. And it is just like Madison, Tennessee.”
    .
  • “I believe that everyone believes in anything. But I also believe in everything.”
    .
  • “Beware of fruit drinks. Believe me, man. You are talking to a global warrior.”

2019 Reading Challenge: My 5 Star Reviews, Part 1

I read 319 books in 2019 and quite a few turned out to be gems! Here are some of my favorites.

The Boy With Wings by Berta Ruck

Written in 1915, this novel contains multiple levels. At its most basic, it is the romance of a Welsh girl and her aviator boyfriend. At another level, it is the story of how war came to England from a woman’s perspective. And finally, at an even deeper level, it is a work that provided social identity to women in a rapidly changing era. I honestly think it should rank as a classic and I cannot believe there are only two reviews of it on Goodreads (and one is mine!) I did not necessarily like the story, but I am amazed by how it captures emotions I still feel–and don’t always know how to express–over a hundred years later. The writing’s very timelessness makes it beloved.

Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther

Martin Luther writes about Paul as one writes about a mutual friend. It brought passages I thought I was pretty well familiar with to light in new ways. I found it a wonderful reminder of the power of justification by faith alone and the work overall uplifting, thought-provoking, and encouraging.

EntreLeadership: 20 Years of Practical Business Wisdom from the Trenches by Dave Ramsey

Dave Ramsey is obviously a very familiar name in financial circles and in EntreLeadership he talks about what it takes to to succeed as a leader, manager, and entrepreneur. This is a pretty foundational read and full of relevant advice and experience. He comes across curmudgeonly at times and I personally would never want to work for him, but I sure enjoyed learning about how he structures incentive and such. This was particularly good as an audio book. 

Daring to Hope: Finding God’s Goodness in the Broken and the Beautiful by Katie Davis Majors

I really love Katie’s first book Kisses from Kate and her second memoir did not disappoint. For those not familiar with her story, Katie did a ‘gap year’ in Uganda…and  ended up staying and adopting 13 orphan girls. Katie experiences more pain and suffering daily than I think most of us ever will fully know. But the point isn’t the magnitude of pain, but the commonality of wondering where God is amidst the pain. Katie opens up about her heartbreak. She writes of losing children and watching friends die, of unanswered prayers and unexpressed doubts. She writes of the gospel and the prophets and patriarchs and in doing so reveals the many cries of God’s people within the Bible. Although different in scope and nature, it reminded me of C.S. Lewis’s A Grief Observed. Powerful, strengthening, and inspiring.

On Fairy-Stories by J.R.R. Tolkien

“Very little about trees as trees can be got into a play.” A lovely essay about truth and fairy tales and creation and…oh, everything worth thinking about. I want to memorize every word. (Though admittedly, this is an area I’m interested in so I was predisposed to love it.) An excellent read following Letters to a Diminished Church by Dorothy L Sayers. The two works touch on the Christian’s role as creator, but in very different ways.

In Plain Sight: Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand by Tyrell Haberkorn

I recommend this book to anyone seriously interested in human rights violations and the way a nation can zealously uphold human rights in name while simultaneously violating them in reality. While this book centers on Thailand specifically, the author does an incredible job describing a universal reality. He describes the class attitudes that uphold the rights of some but not others. Interspersed with theory and facts, he tells compelling stories of human rights violations in Thailand. Throughout he holds that human rights violations did not appear and disappear with each coup d’etat, but rather existed consistently throughout them all. Besides containing a great combination of stories, data, and theory, In Plain Sight was very well written. I read it in one sitting. Great topic sentences! Engaging and well worth the time. 


Grading Papers

I dislike grading papers because most aren’t very good but I feel bad every time I give someone less than an A. Mostly because I cannot imagine anyone would be satisfied with less than an A. It is like I am dealing the ultimate humiliation….a B. Or, gasp, a C

But some of the papers need serious work. Like, the-5-page-paper-consists-of-4-paragraphs kind of work.

And some of these sentences…just…well…see for yourself. 

  • “Being true to his evasive nature, Socrates’ loose construction of metaphors lays the groundwork for this definition of justice without any hard evidence.”
  • “The squirrel eats when it’s hungry, drinks when it’s thirsty, and procreates, well, whenever. It very much does not write essays or study geometry, as far as we know at least.”
  • “As the group became dissatisfied with these definitions, Socrates conjured his own. He meandered around the question, elaborately constructing the ideal City.”
  • “Say a man was preparing to steal a pig from his neighbor. A rational man will see that this will take a food source away from his pig, as well as make him a criminal.”
  • “To conclude: the term “soul’s eye” has two parts, the soul and the eye.” 
  • [And my personal favorite] “Despite what it might seem like, Plato’s Republic is not an early version of The Hunger Games.”

Forget Plato, though. The next discussion group we’re going to have a long talk about the proper use of semi colons. (Hint: when in doubt, don’t.) 


Scalia Dissents

I have spent a lot of time this summer reading cases about religious liberty and the role of the First Amendment. Some rulings I agree with; others I strongly do not. The best feeling in the world, however, is reading a case I adamantly disagree with, noticing the year, and realizing Justice Scalia was on the court. His dissents are the best. Just take this line (internal citations removed): 

“Our cases in no way imply that the Establishment Clause forbids legislators merely to act upon their religious convictions. We surely would not strike down a law providing money to feed the hungry or shelter the homeless if it could be demonstrated that, but for the religious beliefs of the legislators, the funds would not have been approved. Also, political activism by the religiously motivated is part of our heritage. Notwithstanding the majority’s implication to the contrary, we do not presume that the sole purpose of a law is to advance religion merely because it was supported strongly by organized religions or by adherents of particular faiths. To do so would deprive religious men and women of their right to participate in the political process. Today’s religious activism may give us the Balanced Treatment Act, but yesterday’s resulted in the abolition of slavery, and tomorrow’s may bring relief for famine victims.” 

Edwards v. Aguillard, 482 U.S. 578, 615 (1987).


Tuesday Teaser #TuesdayBookBlog

Tuesday teaser is a weekly bookish meme hosted by http://www.booksandabeat.com

Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read.
  • Open to a random page.
  • Share two or three *teaser* sentences from somewhere on that page.
  • Be careful not to include spoilers ~ make sure what you share doesn’t give to much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others.

Share the title and the author too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR list if they like your teasers!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This is more than a sentence or two but it cracked me up….

“Bucket had started his criminal career in Braas…There, he had gotten together with some like-minded peers and started the motorcycle club called The Violence. Bucket was the leader; he decided which newsstand was to be robbed of cigarettes next. He was the one who had chosen the name – The Violence, in English, not Swedish. And he was the one who unfortunately asked his girlfriend Isabella to sew the name of the motorcycle club onto ten newly stolen leather jackets. Isabella had never really learned to spell properly at school, not in Swedish, and certainly not in English.
The result was that Isabella sewed
The Violins on the jackets instead. As the rest of the club members had had similar academic success, nobody in the group noticed the mistake.” (page 79)


Re-reading The Witch of Blackbird Pond

I have blogged at length before about my love of The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare. When forced to pick a favorite book, I usually default to this one. I’ve read it countless times. In fact, I wore out two copies of the book before graduating high school. However, it has been a while since I last read it, so I decided to pick it up again. I forgot how good The Witch of Blackbird Pond is. I really, really, really love this book. 

One reason I enjoy re-reading Georgette Heyer’s novels is that I always discover something new. She uses such subtlety with her characters that I constantly find I have missed something in my earlier reading. This is not the case with Elizabeth George Speare. However, that is not because The Witch of Blackbird Pond lacks subtlety. I have just read this book and daydreamed about it and analyzed it so many times that I almost think I could quote parts of it. Kit and Nat and Mercy and Judith are all old friends to me. I don’t think I could find a new side to them. 

Re-reading this book after a long break, I’ve been struck by how much my enjoyment is mixed up with my familiarity with the story. I find a sense of identity and pleasure as much in remembering reading it as I do in actually reading it. 

It is just like the Cornelia Funke quote in Inkspell:

“Isn’t it odd how much fatter a book gets when you’ve read it several times?…As if something were left between the pages every time you read it. Feelings, thoughts, sounds, smells…and then, when you look at the book again many years later, you find yourself there, too, a slightly younger self, slightly different, as if the book had preserved you like a pressed flower…both strange and familiar.”

This is exactly the reason I added a “re-read” section to my challenge. It is so nice to re-read favorite books. Now if you will excuse me, I have almost reached the scene where Kit discovers the meadow, one of my favorite parts!