Tag Archives: speed reader

Quarantine Book Club

My friend Hope and I decided to try and do a quarantine book club! We compared our currently reading and to-read shelves and came up with a few ideas. 

The thing is…I read too fast to make a very good book club person. She told me today she was thinking of giving up on the book we chose. I had to go to Goodreads to remember which book that was. Ah yes, What Remains of Me by Alison GaylinTwo stars, not very good. Lots of terrible characters. 

Thing is, that was six books ago for me. And possibly one of twelve books read since we decided to do a quarantine book club. (More or less. I don’t remember what day we officially started.) 

I’m not a slow enough reader to make a comfortable buddy reader. Or book club member. 

So we’ve come up with a new solution! I sent her a book I already read and loved. That way we can compare notes without the pressure of reading at the same time! If anyone wants to join us, we are starting with A Brazen Curiosity by Lynn Messina. 

I’m also in the middle of The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Feed by M.T. Anderson, The Two Mrs. Abbots by D.E. Stevenson, and Oedipus at Colonus by Sophocles if any of those capture your fancy instead. Who knows for how long, though! 


300!

Yesterday I celebrated finishing my second final by reading a book…which resulted in me hitting 300 books for 2019! 

Then I finished St. Augustine’s Enchiridion today so I guess technically I’m at 301 at the moment. 

Stay tuned for my 5 and 1 star book lists at the end of the year! It is going to be good. (Or if not good, at least extensive.) 


The Weight of Glory by C.S. Lewis

As a speed reader, I think one of my greatest weaknesses comes from how fast I digest information. No sooner have I read something worth chewing over than I’ve moved on to something else. So, when I find an author who forces me to stop and ponder, I value that author immensely.

C.S. Lewis has always been one of those authors. I picked up The Weight of Glory, which is a sermon he wrote, about three weeks ago and have yet to get any farther than the first paragraph. There is just so much to unpack. Here is how it starts: 

“If you asked twenty good men today what they thought the highest of the virtues, nineteen of them would reply, Unselfishness. But if you had asked almost any of the great Christians of old, he would have replied, Love. You see what has happened? A negative term has been substituted for a positive, and this is of more than philological importance. The negative idea of Unselfishness carries with the suggestion not primarily of securing good things for others, but of going without them ourselves, as if our abstinence and not their happiness was the important point. I do not think this is the Christian virtue of Love.”

If you haven’t read the sermon already, I highly recommend checking it out and reading along with me! It is 9 pages long and available as a pdf here.