The Weight of Glory by C.S. Lewis

As a speed reader, I think one of my greatest weaknesses comes from how fast I digest information. No sooner have I read something worth chewing over than I’ve moved on to something else. So, when I find an author who forces me to stop and ponder, I value that author immensely.

C.S. Lewis has always been one of those authors. I picked up The Weight of Glory, which is a sermon he wrote, about three weeks ago and have yet to get any farther than the first paragraph. There is just so much to unpack. Here is how it starts: 

“If you asked twenty good men today what they thought the highest of the virtues, nineteen of them would reply, Unselfishness. But if you had asked almost any of the great Christians of old, he would have replied, Love. You see what has happened? A negative term has been substituted for a positive, and this is of more than philological importance. The negative idea of Unselfishness carries with the suggestion not primarily of securing good things for others, but of going without them ourselves, as if our abstinence and not their happiness was the important point. I do not think this is the Christian virtue of Love.”

If you haven’t read the sermon already, I highly recommend checking it out and reading along with me! It is 9 pages long and available as a pdf here.

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Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018)

I am super late to the party but let me just echo all the reviews I’ve seen elsewhere and say…Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse was an awesome movie. 

It was interesting. It was funny. It blended humor and action in a way that didn’t feel at odds. It had cool animation. There was a great lesson at the end. It left me wanting more while simultaneously wrapping everything up enough to be satisfying.

I won’t lie, I was skeptical about the hype. But there is a reason for it. 

Totally worth watching. 

Image result for into the spider verse


Remembering I’m an Extrovet

Yesterday, my Mom kindly consented to join me at an AFP event and we headed into Milwaukee. I almost didn’t go. But I RSVPed and felt somewhat obliged to attend and there would be food.

I walked through the doors at the event, looked around the room, and saw people I knew. Moreover, people I liked. Former co-workers, bosses, and mentors. People I spent years fighting alongside. People I only know from Facebook. People I met once years ago. People I wanted to know. The AFP, grassroots world. In the flesh. 

I guess I just didn’t realize how much I missed that world. 

It was like a light flickered on in my head. ‘I know this situation. I am trained for this situation. I can go work the room. I can catch up on all the changes. Network.’

I often feel displaced in law school, to say nothing of the five months I spent in Thailand. But this was the opposite feeling of displacement. It was belonging. 

And I also realized, while I miss the people, I don’t necessarily miss the job. That is, given the chance to go back to my old position, I probably wouldn’t. I like the law. I like the extra layer of understanding I possess when I talk about policies impacting our state. 

I’m not sure where that leaves me, except with a strong reminder that I’m still becoming. No matter how stressful this past year, no matter how stressful the coming one, it is not the last chapter. I’ve got people rooting for me. People who trained me, mentored me, and pushed me forward. And right now a new batch of people train, mentor, and push me. But that doesn’t mean the last bunch forgot about me. They’re still my people. I’m just also getting more people. 

More than anything, the evening reminded me that I’m an extrovert and need to spend more time with people who fill me up. 

Which leads me to a major thank you to my introverted mother for sticking around much later than she wanted while I caught up with people. She also had to deal with my giddy rambling on the drive back. My Mom is the real MVP.


Blogging For Work Part II

We’ve run into a bit of a backlog with consistently updating the blog at work. Thus, my main role today involved back-dating posts to reflect updates we previously sent out to our subscribers. 

The thing is, it didn’t occur to me till I was halfway through the project that I don’t follow our blog and I have no idea if everyone who does gets an e-mail when I backdate something. 

In other words, a whole bunch of people might have an inbox right now that looks something like this:

  • Foundation to file join as intervenor in case (January)
  • Foundation submits motion to join as intervenor in case (February) 
  • Foundation receives permission from Supreme Court to join as intervenor to case (March)
  • Foundation files brief as intervenor in case (April)
  • Foundation files reply brief as intervenor in case (May)
  • Update on Foundation case (June)

 

Update: Good news. We don’t actually have subscribers to our blog.
Bad news. Just found out we don’t actually have subscribers to our blog.


Blogging For Work

Boss: “You blog every day, right?”

Me: “Yup!”

Boss: “So you can whip a few posts up about our last case, right? Should be a breeze!”

Me: * thinks about the story of the runaway watermelon that took 5 minutes to write *

Me: * thinks about the complicated civil procedure litigation we just finished that took weeks of research *

Me: “…yeeeeeep.”


Hand-Written Letters

When I worked at camp, I received numerous hand-written letters from my friends and family. Some I continued corresponding with even after I left camp. I value every letter I received that summer. 

And so, now that my sister and cousin work at camp, I try and send them hand-written letters too. It is a bit tricky because they’ve politely told me they won’t write back. And you can only write so many sentences before you want to throw in a question or two. But I keep writing anyway because I know sometimes the highlights of my days came when I checked my mailbox. 

Writing letters takes time, though. I spent hours today writing. (Well, one of my letters was a 24-page response to a 16-page letter from an old friend who I correspond with regularly but haven’t since before I left for Thailand. Much to catch up on.) It takes time but is worth it! Especially when I get a response. 😉 


Nephew’s Tears

“Bwaaaaaa! Ma-ma! Bwaaaaaa!!!”

I can hear my 8-month old nephew’s sobs coming from my Mom’s phone. My sister-in-law does an incredible job updating us each day with pictures and videos of Devin. And, as he becomes more mobile and finds himself caged in, they frequently involve his attempts at escape and subsequent irritation at being prevented. 

Our reactions to his videos fall into a pattern. First, alarm. 

“Oh no! Why is he crying???” 

Then, once we realize he’s just being denied something, laughter. His sobs suddenly turn funny. They’re so cute! 

Being an aunt is so fun.